Here Comes Summer!

January 9, 2018 juliasurtshin No comments exist

Although the new year has just begun, it’s not too early to begin thinking about how to spend your summer. Time and money are limited resources – how you spend them says a lot about who you are and what you value. This is why colleges often include questions about your summertime activities in their applications. Making plans now mean that you’ll have more options than if you wait and find that program application deadlines have passed, or jobs have been offered to others.

OK, so now that I’ve got your attention, how do you go about figuring out what to do?

Accentuate the Positive & Minimize the Negative

First, think seriously about what your college applications would look like if you were to complete them now. Would you be a competitive applicant for the colleges (or types of colleges) you’re currently considering? If an admissions officer were reviewing your application portfolio today, which aspects would be impressive and what would be your “weak links”? Use your summer to minimize your weak links and/or build on your strengths. Making a specific plan now to address these issues is the surest way to maximize your options and help you be an outstanding college applicant.

Money, Money, Money

Next, ask yourself and your parents if financing your education is an issue? If so, it’s probably time to develop or spiff up your resume and hunt for a job. Getting a jump on your job search means that you’ll have landed a position before others even begin to think about getting a job. Look for job opportunities that, if possible, relate to your interests or current career goals. Your objective, in addition to earning money, should be to develop skills, evaluate career options, and exercise maturity. No matter what job you land, look for ways to engage and learn. Every job is an opportunity to develop meaningful skills and experience.

If you have a competitive college portfolio and if college financing allows you some freedom, the options are endless. There are however, some important things to keep in mind.

Depth, not Breadth

College admission officers are not impressed by applicants who present long lists of activities in which they participate in only minimally. They prefer to see students pursue over time, a few, well-chosen activities. Students who achieve excellence or recognition, take initiative, and assume leadership roles are particularly coveted. If you have an activity that you really enjoy, consider increasing your involvement: teaching your skill to others or assuming responsibility for some club function. This is often a better strategy than starting a new activity.

College Programs

Some of you may want to consider summer enrichment programs taking place at colleges. These can be very interesting and give you a taste of living away from home, but unless they’re actually college programs with selective admission, they aren’t likely to boost your chances of being admitted to that college as a matriculating student. If you know that going in and are still interested, all’s well. Some sources for information about college programs are:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/12zHKUq9yhmqq13OzhYziMMhCg_HJBxeTNDhGtKkkeuo/edit#!

https://www.teenlife.com/category/summer/pre-college-summer-programs/

http://collegelists.pbworks.com/w/page/16119590/Summer%20Programs%20-%20General

Many of these programs have early application deadlines. To have the most choice, apply early.

Passions & Purpose

Pursuing hobbies, traveling and community service are other worthwhile options. If you’re an artist, paint. Writers, use your summer to write. Often you can combine your hobby with doing community service. Sharing your passion for something with others creates a special sense of satisfaction that other activities don’t. Painters, consider applying for jobs at arts camps. Writers, you might volunteer to lead a memoir writing group at a local senior citizens facility. Computer gurus, seniors could use your expertise as well. If you love animals, you might be interested in Zoo Teens https://www.oregonzoo.org/get-involved/volunteer-zoo/zooteens. Applications open during January and typically fill quickly.

You don’t need to travel halfway across the world to have a meaningful experience. There is nothing wrong with traveling to Mexico to volunteer at an orphanage, but college admissions officers are well aware that many of these volunteer programs are costly and that there are children in your local communities that could use your interest as well.

Read

Another novel option (pun intended), use your summer to read, for pleasure! When school is out and you don’t have school reading assignments coming out of your ears, read. Read what you like. Keep track of what you read and annotate your list with thoughts about why you chose a particular title and what you thought of it.

Parting Words

Any activity can be “meaningful”, depending on your attitude. Whatever you choose to do, keep in mind three things. First, admissions reviewers are experts at spotting “put ons”. Don’t choose an activity just because you think it will look good on paper. Secondly, arrange your summer schedule to allow you some time to relax before school starts again so you’ll be refreshed and ready for school in the fall. Finally, ENJOY!

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